Description: http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

Gender, Work and Organization 2012

7th Biennial International Interdisciplinary Conference

27th -29th June 2012, Keele University, Staffordshire, UK

 

Conference organisers:

Deborah Kerfoot (Keele, UK)  d.kerfoot@mngt.keele.ac.uk

Ida Sabelis (Vrije University, NETHERLANDS)

 

Call for abstracts 

Submit your abstract direct to one of the 20 streams listed below

 

As a central theme in social science research of work and organisation, the study of gender has achieved contemporary significance beyond the confines of early discussions of women at work. Launched by Blackwell Publishing in 1994, Gender, Work and Organization was the first journal to provide an arena dedicated to debate and analysis of gender relations, the organisation of gender and the gendering of organisations. Now published by Wiley Blackwell, the journal has full ISI listing and is edited jointly by David Knights, Deborah Kerfoot and Ida Sabelis. The Gender, Work and Organization conference provides an international forum for debate and analysis of a variety of issues in relation to management, work and organisation, and to gender studies. The 2010 conference at Keele University welcomed over 330 international scholars from 37 nations. From papers presented at the conference, special editions of Gender, Work and Organization were prepared on topics including: Work/Life Balance, Leadership, Diversity and the Professions, State Employment and the Gender Pay Gap. It is anticipated that further special editions of the journal will be published from papers presented at the 2012 event. Visit: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1468-0432

 

The conference is held at Keele University, Staffordshire, in Central England, the UK's largest integrated campus university. The University occupies a 617 acre campus site with Grade II registration by English Heritage and has good road and rail access. Many architectural and landscape features dating from the 18th century are of historic significance. The conference venue is stately Keele Hall, the former country residence of the Sneyd family, in the University grounds.

Visit:  http://www.keele-conference.com/2/keele-hall

 

International travellers are served by Manchester and Birmingham airports. On campus accommodation caters for up to 100,000 visitors per year in day and residential conferences.

Travel and transport:                http://www.keele-conference.com/21/directions

Conference venue:                  http://www.keele-conference.com/2/keele-hall

University campus information:          http://www.keele-conference.com/21/directions  (follow pdf link)

Conference package fee: booking form for 27th-29th GWO2012 (conference, meals and 2 nights en-suite accommodation) and discounted `early-bird’ rate, forthcoming on `News and Announcements’ section of our website http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1468-0432

Sample accommodation information: http://www.keele-conference.com/5/accommodation and

http://www.keele-conference.com/125/accommodation-picture-gallery

 

Submit your abstract direct to one of the 20 streams listed below. 
We look forward to welcoming you in person to GWO2012!
Deborah Kerfoot and Ida Sabelis,
Gender, Work & Organization.
 
Gender, Work & Organization journal:
Aims and scope:                    http://www.wiley.com/bw/aims.asp?ref=0968-6673&site=1
Article for the journal?          http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/gwo
Author guidelines:                 http://www.wiley.com/bw/submit.asp?ref=0968-6673&site=1
Editorial Administration:       gwo.journal@mngt.keele.ac.uk
 
GWO is fully ISI listed
Journal ranking 'A' Business and Management category of the Australia Business Deans Council journal rankings http://www.abdc.edu.au/3.37.0.0.1.0.htm
 
 
 

GWO 2012 hosts the following streams:

 

Gender in global knowledge organizations

Stream convenors:

Carla Freeman, Emory University, USA

Kiran Mirchandani, University of Ontario, CANADA

Winifred Poster, Washington University in St. Louis, USA

Minna Salminen-Karlsson, Uppsala University, SWEDEN

 

Eco-feminism, sustainability and organization

Stream Convenors:

Mary Brydon Miller, University of Cincinnati, USA

Anne Inga Hilsen, Fafo Institute for Labour and Social Research, Oslo, NORWAY

Mary Phillips, University of Bristol, ENGLAND

Patricia Gayá Wicks, University of Bristol, ENGLAND

 

Gender, Movement and Belonging

Stream Convenors:

Geraldine Lee-Treweek, Manchester Metropolitan University, ENGLAND

Patricia Lewis, Kent Business School, University of Kent, ENGLAND

Ruth Simpson, Brunel University Business School, ENGLAND

Natasha Slutskaya, Brunel University Business School, ENGLAND

Non-UK co-chair to be confirmed

 

Feminine writing

Stream Convenors:

Heather Höpfl, University of Essex, ENGLAND 

Alison Pullen, Swansea University, WALES

Carl Rhodes, Swansea University, WALES

René ten Bos, Radboud University, NETHERLANDS

 

Intersectionality, work and organisations

Stream Convenors:

Carlos Gomez, University of Santiago de Chile, CHILE

Natalia Rocha-Lawton, University of Hertfordshire, ENGLAND

Jenny Rodriguez, Newcastle University, ENGLAND

 

 

 

Career and Transition: Women Crossing Boundaries

Stream Convenors:

Laurie Cohen, Business and Economics, Loughborough University, ENGLAND

Joanne Duberley, Business School, Birmingahm University, ENGLAND

Dimitria Groutsis, University of Sydney Business School, AUSTRALIA

Diane Vandenbroek, University of Sydney Business School, AUSTRALIA

 

The gendered politics of entrepreneurship

Stream Convenors:

Carin Holmquist, Stockholm School of Economics, SWEDEN

Barbara Poggio, Trento University, ITALY

Elisabeth Sundin , Linköping University, SWEDEN

 

Feminist Activism in Universities

Stream Convenors:

Regine Bendl, WU Vienna, AUSTRIA

Inge Bleijenbergh, Radboud Universiteit, Nijmegen, NETHERLANDS

Charlotte Holgersson, Royal Institute of Technology, SWEDEN

Angelika Schmidt, WU Vienna, AUSTRIA

 

Emotion, aesthetics and materiality

Stream Convenors:

Leanne Cutcher, School of Business, University of Sydney, AUSTRALIA

Karen Dale, Organisation, Work and Technology, Lancaster University, ENGLAND

Philip Hancock, Essex Business School, University of Essex, ENGLAND

Melissa Tyler, Essex Business School, University of Essex, ENGLAND

 

Gender in Science Institutions and Knowledge System

Stream convenors:      

Barry Bozeman, University of Georgia, USA

Elizabeth Pollitzer, Portia Ltd, London, ENGLAND

Teresa Rees, University of Cardiff, WALES

Alison Woodward, Vrije Universiteit, Brussels, BELGIUM

 

Gendered Ageing at Work: Beyond the ‘Double Jeopardy’

Stream convenors:      

Susan Ainsworth, Dept. Management & Marketing, University of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA

Wendy Loretto, Business School, University of Edinburgh, SCOTLAND

Kathleen Riach, Essex Business School, University of Essex, ENGLAND
 

Gender perspectives on Innovation

Stream Convenors:

Gry Agnete Alsos, Bodø Grad. School of Business, University of Nordland, NORWAY

Ulla Hytti, Turku School of Economics, FINLAND

Elisabet Ljunggren, Nordland Research Institute, NORWAY

Malin Tillmar, Linköping University, SWEDEN
 

Intersectionality, work and organisations

Stream Convenors:

Carlos Gomez, University of Santiago de Chile, CHILE

Natalia Rocha-Lawton, University of Hertfordshire, ENGLAND

Jenny Rodriguez, Newcastle University, ENGLAND

 

 

Inequality amongst low paid women workers

Stream Convenors:

Maree Keating, Victoria University, Melbourne, AUSTRALIA

Annie Delaney, Victoria University, Melbourne, AUSTRALIA

Rosaria Burchielli, LaTrobe University, Melbourne, AUSTRALIA

 

Multiple Discrimination and Representation at Work: Intersectionality in Practice

Stream Convenors:

Hazel Conley, Queen Mary University of London, ENGLAND

Sue Durbin, University of the West of England, ENGLAND

Jan Kainer, York University, CANADA

Sian Moore. University of Leeds, ENGLAND

Tessa Wright, Queen Mary University of London, ENGLAND

 

Change and organizational learning

Stream Convenors:

Marieke van den Brink, Radboud University Nijmegen, NETHERLANDS

Jennifer de Vries, University of Western Australia, Perth, AUSTRALIA

Ulla Erikson-Zetterquist, University of Gothenberg, SWEDEN

 

Queering gender, work and organization

Stream Convenors:

Alison Pullen, Swansea University, WALES

Anne Rippin, University of Bristol, ENGLAND

Torkild Thanem, Stockholm University, SWEDEN

Louise Wallenberg, Stockholm University, SWEDEN

 

Sexuality at Work: International Issues and Perspectives

                  Stream Convenors:

Fiona Colgan, London Metropolitan University, ENGLAND

Judith Pringle, Management Dept, Auckland University of Technology, NEW  ZEALAND

Nick Rumens, Department of Management, University of Bristol, ENGLAND

     

Women’s organising

Stream Convenors:

Nicole Avdelidou-Fischer, Queen Mary University of London, ENGLAND

Gill Kirton, Queen Mar, University of London, ENGLAND

Non-UK co-chair  (to be confirmed)

 

`New masculinities’? Reshaping the discourse

Stream convenors:      

Pam Alldred, Brunel University, ENGLAND

Umut Ozkaleili, Cyprus International University, CYPRUS

Janaki Rajan, Jamia Millia University, New Delhi, INDIA

Sweta Rajan-Rankin, Brunel University, ENGLAND

 

General Stream

Stream Convenors:

Deborah Kerfoot, Keele University Management School, ENGLAND

Non-UK co-chairs – to be confirmed

 

 

Description: http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

 

7th international interdisciplinary conference, 27th – 29th June, 2012

Keele University, UK

 

Call for abstracts

 

Gender in global knowledge organizations

 

Stream Convenors:

Carla Freeman, Emory University, USA

Kiran Mirchandani, University of Ontario, CANADA

Winifred Poster, School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, USA

Minna Salminen-Karlsson, Centre for gender research, Uppsala University, SWEDEN

 

The stream aims to promote an upcoming research area on the effects of globalisation on middle class professionals in different parts of the world. The middle class is under-researched in globalisation, organization, and gender studies. Organizational research on transnational business operations originally focused on the exploitation of blue collar workers in the global South and East by firms from the West. Early studies with a gender perspective revealed how globalized manufacturing and service production facilitates the exploitation of the female workforce, and also how local gender relations undergo changes as a result. These studies tend to highlight the production end of the chain. Thus, there is a dearth of gender studies on the provider-customer chain, and work sites located in the headquarters or Western subsidiaries of the companies.

 

Increasingly, qualified work tasks are outsourced from the West to the East, and from the North the South. Indian and Chinese enterprises have followed the example of Japan, emerging as serious competitors to Western companies for outsourcing deals in qualified knowledge work.  This has meant new occupational profiles for the workforce.  On one hand, there has been an expansion of low-educated manual workers and fast-typing,` soft-voiced’ employees with a secondary education and a good command of English for Western companies.  On the other hand, however, Western companies also employ around the world engineers and scientists with university credentials, for example, to construct technical and medical applications.  The business models vary, but often close cooperation between engineers and technicians around the globe in different time zones is required.  Thus, rather than focusing just on issues of exploitation, the recent scholarly view has widened to cooperation and knowledge transfer between people of different cultural backgrounds and societal contexts.

 

Gender relations in this professional, knowledge-intensive, transnational work is an emerging area of research. In general, Western research on gender relations in the South and the East has concentrated on rural areas or lower class groups. This research has mainly dealt with the impact of local/regional gender norms on women’s work and careers, and work-life balance in different societies.  However, the increasing global outsourcing of knowledge-intensive work has brought about a growing number of organizational studies on new issues:  highly-educated professional women in different geographical settings, women’s short-term and long-term mobility, the impact of their work on their private lives, and the transformation of work settings that cut across space and time limitations.  Studies of masculinities in this context are also still scarce.

 

We invite papers about gender relations in transnational knowledge intensive work. Knowledge intensive work is understood here as work in enterprises employing professionals with a college education background or higher. Transnational work is the interaction between companies and/or their employees in at least two different regions, either in multinational enterprises or through different kinds of outsourcing from one company to another. It can also mean, on an individual level, an individual working in at least two regions during his or her career. This stream draws from several emerging theoretical streams in feminist studies of work and organizations. Seminal is the interdisciplinary literature on gender and global firms, which brought attention to the centrality of women to the transnational capitalist economy.  The work of Aiwa Ong is an important inspiration.  Our emphasis, however, is on the more recent developments in shift to professional and white collar work for women in the global economy. Theoretical perspectives exploring the role that the body plays in the labor process is key here. Carla Freeman shows how even lower level data entry work in global firms is upskilled through managerial imperatives for dress codes and high heels. We place a strong emphasis on knowledge work in the field of professional services.  Here we rely on theories of organizations in the information society, inspired by the frameworks of Manual Castells and Saskia Sassen.  This means exploring the growing importance of work in research and development, information technology, engineering, etc., and women’s presence within them.  Here the work of Wendy Faulkner is critical as a guide. Central to the process of knowledge work is transnationalism, and therefore we consider theoretical work on the gendering of business offshoring.  The work of Kiran Mirchandani in exploring gender and race dynamics in Indian outsourcing is important here. Finally, we incorporate theoretical literatures on women in management and diversity in multinational firms. This also includes the vast theorizing on work and family. We incorporate the developments in the critical studies of men and masculinities in the analysis of globalization. This pays attention to the role of transnational business masculinity in global economies, and how they affect women, like the work of Raewyn Connell, Jeff Hearn and Rebecca Piekkari, as well as Christine Beasley.

 

We invite theoretical and theoretically informed studies, as well as analyses of gender issues in knowledge-intensive transnational work. Papers may include micro-level organizational studies as well as societal and cultural analyses on a larger scale. Submissions may address, but are not limited to, the following fields:

 

·                    Gender in middle class urban environments and local company cultures in different parts of the world - How do middle class cultures differ around the world, and how these feed into company cultures of highly-educated professionals? How do intersections with gender, such as education, ethnicity, race, age, married status, religion etc., affect professional knowledge-intensive work in different settings? How do employment patterns, with transnational connections, for middle class professionals affect the local cultural spheres outside work?

 

·         Encounters of different masculinities and femininities in business relations - Transnational business masculinity is increasingly contested. In different types of corporate relations (such as high-level negotiations or routine dynamics of virtual teams), there is a confluence of different regional, national and local masculinities and, increasingly, femininities.  How do variations in “doing” masculinities and femininities affect transnational interaction and cooperation?

 

·         Gendered patterns of mobility of highly educated professionals  - When and for whom is mobility – both moving “out” and moving “back home” – an option? What restrictions on mobility are faced by women and men? How does moving between locations affect career progress, work satisfaction, work-life balance and family relations of women and men? What do women and men gain from being mobile and what do they lose?

 

·         Gendered divisions of qualified work tasks across geographical locations - Societies have different ideas of what is men’s work and women’s work.  For example,  while there is a tight connection of technical work with masculinity in North America and Western Europe, it is more gender neutral in South and South East Asia. How do such differences affect the gendered division of professional work? How do understandings of “competence” vary globally, and how does this affect gendered divisions of work?  How do gender differences in pay for the same kind of job vary around the globe, and how does that affect the division of work? How do gendered divisions of work affect women’s and men’s career possibilities in different locations?

 

·         Work-life balance in professional work around the globe and transgressing space and time limitations  - How do educated professionals around the globe solve their work-life problems?  What types of issues do they face from technology, such as when work is done in virtual teams, in different time zones, entails frequent travelling?  What are the disruptions of work-life balance that are different from those of lower educated workers in multinational firms or other global industries?

 

·         Diversity management in multinational knowledge organizations - Most large companies have an official diversity policy, and claim to follow the legislation from their home countries. How do multinational companies formulate and administer diversity policies in locations which differ substantially from those of their home country?  How is diversity addressed not only in terms of gender norms, but also ethnic or religious composition?  What kinds of contributions are appropriate and / or possible on the part of the employer and the employees?

 

·         Women and management around the globe - While research into women’s career progression and leadership abounds, most of it is done in Western countries. How are women’s management positions in knowledge-intensive organizations shaped in varying cultural contexts?

 

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st October 2011 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and young scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. In the first instance, abstracts should be emailed to  Minna.Salminen@gender.uu.se   Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract.

 

 

 

Description: Description: Description: http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

 

7th international interdisciplinary conference 27th -29th June 2012

Keele University, UK

 

Call for Abstracts

 

Eco-feminism, sustainability and organization

 

Stream Convenors:

Mary Brydon Miller, University of Cincinnati, USA

Anne Inga Hilsen, Fafo Institute for Labour and Social Research, Oslo, NORWAY

Mary Phillips, University of Bristol, ENGLAND

Patricia Gayá Wicks, University of Bristol, ENGLAND

 

In the face of multiple ecological crises, such as climate change, pollution and depletion of biodiversity and habitat, the responses of most organizations and most mainstream management literature are characterized by greenwashing, the technical fix and a business case approach based on eco-efficiency. As Banerjee (2003, p. 173) points out: ‘There is still a belief that better technology and management and more “inclusive” procedures by international institutions...can save the planet’ while Harvey (1996, p. 148) comments that sustainability issues such as scarcity of resources, biodiversity, and ecological limits are subsumed in a debate about the ‘preservation of a particular social order rather than a debate about the preservation of nature per se’.  The primacy of technology, science and economic progress remains largely unquestioned (Dryzek, 1997; Hopwood, Mellor and O’Brien, 2005; Newton and Harte, 1997; Shrivastava, 1994).

 

It is thus apparent that techno-rational responses to ecological challenges, where the environment/nature is presented as something to be managed through mastery and domination or appropriated, commodified and consumed (Banerjee, 2003), are grounded in what Connell has referred to as hegemonic masculinity (1995). Masculinity is aligned with reason, the mind and the human in dualistic frameworks that devalue the feminine, emotion, the body and the natural world. This is a long-established tenet of feminist theory, but its treatment has tended to focus on the implications for gender, instead of what it might mean for gender and nature. Ecofeminism has thus developed in response to the ways in which ‘woman’ and ‘nature’ are conceptually linked in Western thought, wherein the processes of inferiorization have been mutually reinforcing. In so doing, ecofeminism has the potential to mount a radical challenge to current organizational and academic discourses (Plumwood, 1993). This stream seeks to provide an arena through which ecofeminist concepts can be further developed in the context of studies of work and organization.

 

As an academic discourse, ecofeminism is located in the field of environmental ethics.  It has largely been ignored outside this, even by feminist academics. There is also evidence that it has not just been ignored but silenced (Sturgeon, 1997) possibly because some early expositions tended to posit what were regarded as essentialist connections between women and nature (Mies and Shiva, 1993). However, ecofeminism is an approach that can articulate epistemic, moral and political positions by applying feminist philosophy and ethics to relations with the more than human world, thus generating  broader theories of oppression and liberation. It seeks to illuminate the interwoven nature of imperialism, ecological degradation, exploitation of workers, racism and women’s oppression by offering critique but also by visioning creative alternatives that are life affirming and transformative. It does not, however, offer a grand theory to replace current truth claims. Instead, it is pluralist and multicultural yet committed to core values such as justice and caring. Karen Warren, whose work has been highly influential in the development of a philosophical ecofeminism, has metaphorized ecofeminism as a quilt: ‘An ecofeminist philosophical quilt will be made up of different “patches”, constructed by quilters in particular social, historical and materialist contexts’ (2000:66). In the same way that the borders of a quilt can contain an infinite richness of patterns, colours and designs, the parameters of ecofeminism allow for a wide range of emphases and methodologies (Cuomo, 2002).

 

In this stream we therefore seek papers that can be located broadly within an ecofeminist commitment to the study of gender and nature in work and organizations. More specifically, we are interested in papers that build on such an approach to provide a critical analysis of the gendered ways in which organizations, and organizational studies, represent, construct and appropriate nature and how that might be subverted and re-imagined. The primary aim is therefore to analyse the relations between gender, organization and the ‘natural world’.

 

Areas of interest include but are not limited to:

·         Developing methodologies for ecofeminist research

·         Enhancing ecofeminism through productive encounters and cross-fertilizations with feminist philosophers such as Hélène Cixous or Luce Irigaray

·         Generative deconstructions of associations of masculinity with the domination of nature

·         Envisioning embodied, emotional responses to ecological challenges

·         Critiques of gendered sustainability discourses

·         Ecofeminist responses to globalization

·         Intersections between the colonization of nature and effects on disenfranchised communities

·         Appropriations of nature in organizational strategies (eg representations in marketing, the development of eco-tourism, “wilderness” experiences)

·         Connections between the devaluation and abjection of women’s bodies and maternality in organizations and that of nature

·         Ecofeminist perspectives on animal ethics applied to organizations

·         Ecofeminist spirituality as a means of enacting a critique of hyper-rationality

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st October 2011 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and young scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. In the first instance, abstracts should be emailed to  Mary.Phillips@Bristol.ac.uk  Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract.

 

 

 

Description: http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

 

7th biennial international interdisciplinary conference, 27th – 29th June, 2012

Keele University, UK

 

Call for abstracts

 

Gender, Movement and Belonging

Stream Convenors:

Geraldine Lee-Treweek, Manchester Metropolitan University, ENGLAND

Patricia Lewis, Kent Business School, University of Kent, ENGLAND

Ruth Simpson, Brunel University Business School, ENGLAND

Natasha Slutskaya, Brunel University Business School, ENGLAND

Non-UK co-chair to be confirmed

 

Movement is a central experience in many people’s lives and, arguably, one which increasingly defines the postmodern condition. Movement as in a passage from one ‘location’ in time and/or space to another can occur in a ‘real’ sense as in spatial movement between and within national borders and/or organizations, or imagined as in our personal sense of development and change. Given that the articulation of gender manifests differently across different times and spaces, movement can be seen to be fundamentally gendered. Not only has movement traditionally been a key resource for the construction of masculinity, positioned against the supposed ‘non-movement’ and spatial constraint of women (Halford and Leonard, 2006), but inherent ‘sutures and departures’ within movement construct new boundaries and foci of identification - with likely gendered implications for how these processes are managed and experienced (Fortier, 2000). 

 

As Ahmed (2004) points out, movement must be understood in conjunction with belonging and attachment. In this respect, as she argues, belonging can be seen to be constituted through movement. Belonging here refers to inclusion ‘that mark(s) out terrains of commonality and attachment, through which the social dynamics and politics of ‘fitting in’ are delineated’ (Ahmed, 2004: 2). Men and women are likely to experience belonging differentially given that its parameters may well be drawn on the basis of conformity to normative conceptions of gender appropriateness. Further, belonging emphasises not just attachment to place, commitment and identity but also a sense of affinity and emotional engagement so that belonging is often created through the attachment to our own feelings (Ahmed, 2004). Given the profoundly gendered nature of affectivity (Lewis and Simpson, 2007), it is likely that types of attachment and belonging will be differentially encountered and experienced. 

 

The feeling of belonging in the context of work can be understood through both temporal and territorial identification. In terms of the former, movement seemingly involves dispensing with the ‘old’ and picking up the ‘new’. Inherent to notions of vision and progress is a trust (and confidence) in the future and a sense of shared belonging (Bauman, 2000).  However, as Bauman (2000) argues, belonging involves present, future and the past. Balibar (1991) acknowledges that ‘past-ness’ informs current behaviour and is an integral part of the socialization of individuals and the maintenance of group cohesion. These processes are likely to be deeply gendered. Thus, Lee-Treweek (forthcoming) found that female Polish migrants appropriated ‘old’ and traditionally gendered ways of understanding and being as a form of resistance to negative meanings attached to their work. Although physically mobile, they were ‘stuck’ in old forms of (gendered) self-definition and (gendered) self-differentiation. Equally, Fortier (2000) showed how emotions of nostalgia and social dynamics of remembrance imbued male and female migrants’ experiences, influencing how they differentially made sense of work based and non-work institutions.

 

Gender is equally evident in terms of places and spaces. As Massey (2004) argues, places and spaces – and the processes of moving towards and moving away - are key resources for constructing gendered selves, forming the basis for (gendered) experiences. Thus, the public sphere has traditionally been seen as the domain of men – engendering well documented resistance to the ‘encroachment’ of women and where women in turn have often sought out spaces where they are less likely to feel stigmatized and de-valued. Further, as Gregson and Rose (2000) note, movement and opportunities for mobility  as well as meanings attached to space can come together to strengthen gender power relations and can be drawn upon to support a performance and subjectivity of ‘male’ and ‘female’. Space thus constitutes a dynamic resource that is both active and activated in gendered body performances. 

 

Against this background, this stream seeks to investigate the complex relationship between gender, movement and belonging in the context of work and organization. One focus here will be on movements across national borders and the gendered nature of migration effects.  Social policy approaches to migration have often viewed the key drives of belonging as linked to governmental issues. This has focussed attention on engagement and belonging with community life but has minimised the important role of work, employment and organisations in supporting belonging and sense of identity – despite the fact that migration often involves a movement from one work context to another. Moreover, gendered implications have often been overlooked (Lee-Treweek, forthcoming). Here, the tendency for migrants to move into traditionally gendered occupations (e.g. as female domestic workers, male construction workers) highlights the gendered nature of movement (Fortier, 2000) as well as the likely tensions associated with transience, attachment and departure. This raises questions as to how gender and occupational identities are positioned in relation to past identities and in terms of possible intentions to return - as well as how male and female migrants value future opportunities. Further, movement and belonging are likely to involve tensions through attachment to as well as distinction from different groups and the meanings given to new and existing social constellations. Questions arise concerning how gender and other reference points (e.g. geography, culture, class, ethnicity) are drawn upon to construct a sense of self in the context of often low status work or work that takes place in the informal economy; the gendered nature and role of social spaces in creating a sense of belonging at work. Other issues, with a strong gendered dimension, relate to work that may be illegal/forced or abusive (as in the cases of undocumented workers or trafficked people) or when work brings conflict with powerful employers and/or other employees (as in the recent case of university migrant cleaners fighting for a living wage in London).  Finally, meanings relating to transience and belonging help surface the emotional dimensions of migrancy (Probyn 1996). These raise questions about the emotions engendered through relocation and dislocation and how these might vary according to gender - through the desire to belong and through potential transformations of self; the insecurities resulting from weakening of social structures and routines; and the emotions central to memory work and to meanings attached to ‘home’.

 

While movements across national boundaries comprise a key focus of this stream, we also welcome papers that explore movements within and across organizational boundaries and the implications for experiences of belonging. This may relate, for example, to the movement of women into senior positions in organizations or into male dominated work contexts and/or the movement of men into non-traditional roles; identity implications of movement within and across organizations; gendered experiences of dislocation and detachment in work contexts; the gendered nature social mobility as, for example, men and women through their work contexts, cross class based (as well as temporal and spatial) delineations; how spaces are both gendered and gendering and how men and women, through movement, create spaces of exclusion and belonging; and personal narratives of movement, development and change.

 

In summary, papers can be based on the following overlapping areas:

·         The role of organizations in gendered formations of belonging and non-belonging in contexts of mobility and movement

·         How is the past drawn upon by men and women to create attachment to new places and spaces

·         The emotional and gendered dimensions of movement and belonging; of location and dislocation

·         Movement and gendered identity; nature and experiences of attachment and detachment

·         ‘Gendered movement’ over time; influence of past identities; memory work

·         ‘Gendered movement’ across space; how place and space influence constructions and performances of gender; how social space is implicated in feelings of belonging; how dislocation is experienced and managed

·         Movement and formation of attachments; how gender, ethnicity, class, geography are drawn on to construct self in different work contexts; gendered implications of social mobility.

·         Personal accounts of movements (e.g. in relation to development and change) and experiences of new belongings; how these help understand gendered dimensions

 

All papers within the stream are expected to theorise the links between gender, movement and belonging through their empirical research sites. We welcome papers that recognise the intersections between gender, social class, race and ethnicity, age and power at work.     

 

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st October 2011 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and young scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. In the first instance, abstracts should be emailed to R.Simpson@brunel.ac.uk  Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract.

 

 

Description: http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

 

7th international interdisciplinary conference, 27th – 29th June, 2012

Keele University, UK

 

Call for abstracts

 

Feminine writing

 

Stream Convenors

Heather Höpfl, University of Essex, ENGLAND 

Alison Pullen, Swansea University, WALES

Carl Rhodes, Swansea University, WALES

René ten Bos, Radboud University, NETHERLANDS

 

"The woman's silence meets with the man's vocal 'orgé', with a wrath as heavy as Euridicy's silence." (Silvia Montiglio (2010) Silence in the Land of Logos, page 243).

 

This track focuses on the gendered character of what gender, work and organization researchers themselves do when they engage in theorizing and writing. The track will bring together writers who wish to disturb the taken-for-granted gender neutrality of organizational research in relation to the often implicitly masculine-rational order that structures the field. Our focus is not only on how gender is something that we study, but also how our own gendered practice and subjectivity infuse our very own research and writing. We call for papers that interrogate the theoretical-philosophical issues underpinning the gendered processes of textualization in which we are immersed ourselves. More specifically, what we expect authors to do is to put in question those persistent forms of writing which seek to achieve the homologation of women within patriarchal order. Moreover, what does this mean for the position, representation and embodied experience of women working in management and organization theory? This stream hopes to create a space for exploring difference, gender and feminism where issues of exclusion, voice and politics are raised.

 
It is generally assumed that the act of writing is unproblematic, that there are specific styles– the journalistic, the academic, legalistic, novelistic, diaristic, personal and so forth – which can be acquired through training or disposition, and that these styles can be exercised with varying degrees of competence in the act of writing.  However, beyond the most obvious and clichéd simplicities, little attention has been paid to gendered writing in organization studies. Instead, there has been a widespread assumption in conventional organization theorising that patriarchal language and writing is not only entirely appropriate as the bench-mark standard but, more than this, it is the desired medium of communication for academic discourse.  Looking beyond organization studies, however, issues of gendered writing have been considered in considerable depth. Thirty years have passed since French feminist writers such as Hélène Cixous, Julia Kristeva and Luce Irigaray began making their contribution to feminist writing and thinking. Diverse authors such as Avital Ronell, Shoshana Felman, Adriana Cavavero, or Silvia Montiglio have further developed this kind of research. Despite the depth and insight of all these contributions, the convenors of this stream feel that there is a sense among researchers that feminist issues have become somewhat wearisome or outmoded. Indeed it has been suggested that we are witnessing the passing of feminism.  The political possibilities created by the writers mentioned above have just not materialized (especially in organization studies) and the culturally dominant ways of perceiving and positioning men and women in relation to writing has not changed.  Indeed, the privileged [masculine] style of writing has been regarded as the primary acquisition of an academic education. ‘Other writing’ which bleeds, disrupts, provokes whilst challenging masculine/authoritarian writing is by and large unacceptable. 

 

In seeking to reinvigorate the possibilities for feminine research and writing the stream will examine the possibilities of writing difference. In relation to feminine writing, we question dominant structures and practices that seek to limit what organizational researchers are allowed to write and how they are allowed to write it. We are also concerned with the consequences of these constrictions for the way in which researchers develop their academic identity both in terms self-expression and the communication of ideas, and, work roles and career progression. In order to both question existing practice and develop new ones, some areas to consider include, but not limited to:

·         Embodied writing practices

·         Genres and mediums of writing, from text to textile

·         Experimental writing

·         Critiques of masculine writing

·         Feminine styles, genres, practices

·         Writing the body

·         Writing, rationality and affect

·         Marginalisation of women’s writing

·         Feminist ethics and writing

·         Reflexivity, feminism and writing

·         Writings of women

·         Feminist writings – feminist writing

·         Women, writing and academe

·         Writing as resistance – from anarchy to subversion

·         The politics of writing

·         Abjection, oppression, marginalisation

·         Cultural differences, feminism and women’s writing

·         The problematic of voicing the self and other in writing

·         The ethical violence of writing as an inscription of the other

·         Rationality, irrationality and the feminine

 

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st October 2011 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and young scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. Abstracts should be emailed to  A.Pullen@swansea.ac.uk  Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract.

 

 

Description: http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

 

7th international interdisciplinary conference, 27th-29th June, 2012

Keele University, UK

 

Call for abstracts

Intersectionality, work and organisations

 

Stream Convenors:

Carlos Gomez, University of Santiago de Chile, CHILE

Natalia Rocha-Lawton, University of Hertfordshire, ENGLAND

Jenny Rodriguez, Newcastle University, ENGLAND

 

The stream seeks to showcase conceptual, theoretical and theoretically informed empirical discussion about intersectionality, work and organisation. The stream has a twofold aim. Firstly, to advance discussions on epistemic critiques and their implications for the way intersectionality is used as an analytical and interpretive framework to explore dynamics of power at work and organisations. Secondly, at a more practical level, the panel seeks to contribute to the understanding of how intersectionality is/could be used when researching work and organisations.

Intersectionality continues to be at the centre of debates looking at power dynamics from the perspective that argues interdependence between intersecting inequalities of gender, race, sexuality, age, disability, social class, religion, and nationality, among others, in relation to subject formations, positions and identities. Conceptually, discussions have moved from embracing Crenshaw’s (1991) propositions about the need to challenge and deconstruct single axis notions of identity, to discussing notions of pure and hybrid intersectionalities (Brah & Phoenix, 2004). More recently, the debate has advanced to more divisive thinking where some authors (McCall, 2005) address methodological complexities of intersectionality, whilst others (Ehrenreich, 2002) question the suitability of the use of ‘intersecting categories’ as the best way to approach the discussion and hint to a post-intersectionality agenda that shifts from ‘intersectionality’ to ‘multidimensionality’.

Yet the scope of intersectionality makes it useful for both its theoretical and conceptual functions, as well as its political and agentic functions to highlight and explain the inseparability of categories of difference (individual, institutional, social and cultural) and how these interact with power (McCall, 2005; Yuval-Davis, 2006). The mutually constitutive nature of inequalities and structures of discrimination argued by intersectional theories also provides a useful foundation to understand continuities, shifts and transformations of power in organisations. At the same time intersectionality is a contested framework due to the broadness of intersectional theory and practice, which leads to different, inconsistent, ambiguous, and open-ended approaches (Phoenix & Pattynama, 2006; Davis, 2008). For instance, despite the mainstreaming of intersectionality in policy-making, intersectional looks at work and organisations at an empirical level, in particular lived experiences of workers and how intersections affect structures of work and organisational dynamics, remain under-researched. The work of Joan Acker (2000, 2006) on inequality regimes set important arguments to advance the discussion on intersectionality in work organisations and a few others (Staunæs, 2006; Britton & Logan, 2008; Essers & Benschop, 2009; Holvino, 2010; Dahlkild-Öhman& Eriksson, 2011; Healy et al., 2011) have added significant theoretical and empirical insights. Yet the potential of this discussion has not been fully capitalised and it remains at the margins of the meta-narratives of work and organisation. Taylor et al. (2010:2) argue that intersections need to be “empirically substantiated demonstrated and ‘delivered’ [because] the formalistic addition and repetition of ‘intersectionality’ leaves out the intimate interconnections, mutual constitutions and messiness of everyday identifications and lived experiences”. That is an imperative challenge to advance understanding on the interplay between intersectionality, work and organisations. More discussion is needed to map the use of intersectionality in the study of work and organisations and expand understanding of how intersecting structures sustain and perpetuate power mechanisms and systems of subordination in work settings. Moreover, these discussions need to span across geographies, temporalities, disciplines and perspectives so that they account not only for complexities in the intersections themselves but also for how these interplay with wider issues associated to contemporary work and organisational dynamics, such as debates on migration, varieties of capitalism, and more generally globalisation. The stream invites contributions of theoretical, conceptual and empirical works that focus on intersectional analyses of workers, work and/or organisations. Papers are invited on (but not limited to) the following themes:

 

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st October 2011 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and early career scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. In the first instance, abstracts should be emailed to  jenny.rodriguez@ncl.ac.uk   Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract.

 

Description: Description: Description: http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

 

7th international interdisciplinary conference 27th -29th June 2012

Keele University, UK

 

Call for abstracts

 

Career and Transition: Women Crossing Boundaries

 

Stream Convenors:

Laurie Cohen, Business and Economics, Loughborough University, ENGLAND

Joanne Duberley, Business School, Birmingahm University, ENGLAND

Dimitria Groutsis, University of Sydney Business School, AUSTRALIA

Diane Vandenbroek, University of Sydney Business School, AUSTRALIA

 

Recent approaches towards career theory tend to view career as ‘multi-directional’ Baruch (2004), ‘boundaryless’ (Arthur and Rousseau 1996) or ‘protean’ (Hall 1996).  These models suggest that individuals are taking their own initiative and moving more often and more easily between countries, industries, professions and firms (Sullivan, Forret, Mainiero and Terjesen, 2007).  However there has been limited empirical research to date in the careers field which explicitly examines women’s experiences of movement across contexts.  

 

This stream focuses on the experiences of women who undertake career transitions which involve crossing boundaries. We aim to take a broad perspective and consider a variety of different types of transition including downshifting, retirement, moves into self employment etc. In doing so, we hope to develop improved understanding of the complexities of women’s career decision-making and transition.  In recent years careers scholars have been preoccupied with questions about boundaries, in particular coalescing around questions of boundarylessness. (e.g. Bagdadli et al., 2003; Guest & Mackenzie Davey, 1996; Gunz et al., 2000 Cohen & Mallon, 1999; Jacoby, 1999) and critiques of this concept.  We are interested in papers that move on from the debate about boundaryless careers.  In this stream we will critically evaluate the notion of career boundaries and explore women’s experience of boundary crossing. Recent work by Gunz et al. (2002) has provided valuable contributions to existing understandings. They argue that career boundaries have a subjective dimension (perceived barriers to career progress) and objective dimension (real barriers to mobility) and that boundaries can ‘be imposed by specialization, industry, the firm, occupation, educational level, experience, geography, professional qualification, organizational membership and to a lesser degree (although nevertheless real), age, race, ethnicity, sex, and religion’ (Gunz et al 2002: 62).  This stream will include both aspects, with the endeavour of building on the subjective/objective dimensions

 

We particularly welcome papers that examine the context of career transition.  Career is seen by many as an exclusive construct, used to describe the ways in which relatively affluent individuals in more economically developed countries construct their working lives over time, the courses they steer through a variety of organizational, occupational and domestic imperatives and the role others play in helping or hindering them in this unfolding journey (Richardson, 2000). In addition, it is largely acontextual, focussing exclusively on the individual and its choices and neglecting the role of various contextual layers such as culture, class or societal embeddedness (Mayrhofer, Meyer and Steyrer 2007). We would argue that such a view often misses out on what is most thought-provoking, disturbing and potentially most illuminating about the concept. Our aim in this stream is to extend traditional notions of career by giving attention more explicitly to issues of class, gender and ethnicity, to consider those who are often excluded in contemporary discourses about career and to consider the importance of national/cultural and community contexts and affiliations.  Thus we hope to challenge career theory and develop a more inclusive and contextualised consideration of the concept of career. Likewise, we explore the usefulness of this concept in theory and practice for situations and individuals currently not covered by the bulk of career research.

 

Although this is by no means an exhaustive list, we welcome papers addressing the following areas:

·                     Objective and subjective career boundaries

·                     Women’s experience of career transitions across contexts

·                     Constraints and enablers to crossing company/industry/professional/national barriers

·                     The move from org employment to self-employment?

·                     Experiences of alternative types of career transition: eg downshifting, retirement etc.

·                     Women’s experiences of expatriate careers

·                     Career implications of the migration/asylum nexus

·                     Women and career transgression

 

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st October 2011 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and young scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. In the first instance, abstracts should be emailed to  j.p.duberley@bham.ac.uk  Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract.

 

 

Description: Description: http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

 

7th biennial international interdisciplinary conference, 27th – 29th June, 2012

Keele University, UK

 

Call for abstracts

 

The gendered politics of entrepreneurship

Stream Convenors

Carin Holmquist, Stockholm School of Economics, SWEDEN

Barbara Poggio, Trento University, ITALY

Elisabeth Sundin , Linköping University, SWEDEN

 

Today entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial behaviour is in focus. Research, in particular gender research, has shown that entrepreneurship is strongly gendered (Ahl  2002, Attila et al 2004, Phillips & Knowles 2010) and that this has notable effects especially when entrepreneurship is defined as starting and owning a firm. Most visibly perhaps, women are less prone to start their own firms – generally only ¼ to 1/3 of all businesses are run by women. In most countries women are today encouraged to start their own business but still the proportion of women is only increasing very slowly (see for instance Global Entrepreneurship Monitor).

 

The underlying perspective in politics of and of entrepreneurship is one of gender mainstreaming, few – if any countries – build their entrepreneurship support system from a more radical gender perspective (Pettersson 2007, 2011).   This is however what could be expected since this political fields  support to women’s entrepreneurship is formed to fill the “gaps” in women’s competence thereby implying that women start fewer firms because they lack skills, networks etc.. The marginalization of women’s entrepreneurship is also seen in the budgets allotted to support it – as an example we find that in 2011 in Sweden the overall budget for support to entrepreneurship and firms is 4,3 billions, of this only 100 millions are specifically destined towards women’s entrepreneurship.

 

There are many reasons for women’s lower participation in entrepreneurship – lower wages (making it harder to save), more household work (making time scarce), attitudes towards women etc. Discussions on that point can be found both in main-stream-handbooks on entrepreneurship like Wickham (2009) and in research with different kinds of gender-perspectives (Verheul et al 2004. Brush et al 2009).  One reason that is less visible and discussed is the gendered politics of entrepreneurship, i.e. the effects of the political systems on the gendering of entrepreneurship (Baines 2010). Political systems are different between different countries but we also see that there are similarities and that ideas are spread between countries (Lundström and Stevenson  2005).

 

The present strong interest in and support for entrepreneurship, especially women´s entrepreneurship, is based in current problems in the economies of different countries. The problems are of many kinds like slow growth, high unemployment rates and that the traditional economic tools do not seem to work. Entrepreneurship, or at least self-employment, is depicted as the “the last chance” for politicians and for individuals. The neo-liberal turn, sometimes in the name of NPM (New Public Management) challenges the traditional policy in many countries. Entrepreneurship is, in that model, not the last chance but the first option.  Both on EU-level and on the national agendas women are often mentioned as a category of special interest in this rhetoric.

 

This track invites papers that discuss the relation between politics, of different kinds, and entrepreneurship from a gender perspective. The policy fields above are examples but there are other relevant fields of interest.  As this is an emerging field, the need for empirical knowledge is high as is need for empirical studies with critical perspectives to challenge and elaborate theories. We welcome theoretically informed empirical studies as well as theoretical analyses. Comparisons, both between sectors, policy areas and nations, are especially welcome as are re-readings of older studies, investigating the interaction of gendering of politics and of entrepreneurship.

 

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st October 2011 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and young scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. In the first instance, abstracts should be emailed to carin.holmquist@hhs.se  Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract.

 

Description: Description: http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

 

7th biennial international interdisciplinary conference, 27th – 29th June, 2012

Keele University, UK

 

Call for abstracts

 

Feminist Activism in Universities

Stream Convenors:

Regine Bendl, WU Vienna, AUSTRIA

Inge Bleijenbergh, Radboud Universiteit, Nijmegen, NETHERLANDS

Charlotte Holgersson, Royal Institute of Technology, SWEDEN

Angelika Schmidt, WU Vienna, AUSTRIA

 

Incorporating measures towards gender equality in higher education has mainly been women’s work. Initially starting as a feminist grassroots bottom-up activist movement in the wake of the Second Feminist Movement, women have been central in changing the cultural values in their home university where those in positions of power to contest or enact the change have been men. As Scully & Segal (2002, p. 127) would name it, these female grassroots bottom-up activists were faced with “managing management” in order to introduce gender equality. They were engaged in micro-mobilisation, in sustaining their collective efforts over cycles of involvement, in managing risks to their careers and their mission, and in evaluating the accomplishment of their interrelated and local goals (Scully & Segal, 2002, p. 126). Thus, an understanding of the micro-level of the processes emerges from insights as to how women have been involved and are still engaged in unmasking their organisational exclusion from access to resources, influence, career opportunities and academic authority (Morley, 1999). In light of these insights, it is interesting to explore the role of feminist activism in contemporary university settings that are increasingly subject to managerialisation, presenting both opportunities and challenges for feminist activism (cf. Goode & Bagilhole, 1998; Thomas & Davies, 2002).

 

Therefore, for this stream we invite papers that examine the forms in which feminist activism is played out within contemporary managerial universities. In particular, we would like to explore questions such as:

 

·  What do feminist collective change efforts within managerial universities look like today?

·  What feminist voices are present at managerial universities? What are the risks and advantages of being a feminist academic at this point of time?

·  What promises and dangers does the increasing managerialisation of universities hold for feminist scholars and activists?

·  How do generational changes of feminist scholars and activists play out and how do they contribute to change efforts from within?

·  How do gender equality representatives/administrators perform their strategies and actions towards (gender) equality at universities? What are their risks? What advantages do their positions provide for change from within?

·  How can the efforts for change towards (gender) equality from within universities be encouraged and sustained?

·  What notions of feminist theory and feminist action have to be re-visited in order to sustain the target of (gender) equality and support its move further into the centre and mainstream of managerial universities?

 

We want to address these issues by paying attention to action based research approaches and to historical and local contexts of gender change processes taking place within universities. Finally, we encourage a reflexive approach towards feminist positions within these change or ‘managing management’ processes.

 

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st October 2011 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and young scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. In the first instance, abstracts should be emailed to charlotte.holgersson@itm.kth.se  Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract.

 

Description: http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

 

7th biennial international interdisciplinary conference, 27th- 29th June, 2012 

 Keele University, UK

 

Call for abstracts

 

Emotion, aesthetics and materiality

Stream Convenors:

Leanne Cutcher, School of Business, University of Sydney, AUSTRALIA

Karen Dale, Organisation, Work and Technology, Lancaster University, ENGLAND

Philip Hancock, Essex Business School, University of Essex, ENGLAND

Melissa Tyler, Essex Business School, University of Essex, ENGLAND

 

The ‘Emotion and Aesthetics’ stream has been offered at Gender, Work and Organization conference since 2007.  Since that time the overall aim of the stream has been to encourage participants to consider the ways in which research into the gendered nature of emotional and aesthetic labour and its organization might be developed. At the 2010 conference, we took the opportunity to broaden the focus of the stream to include recent developments in the study of emotional and aesthetic forms of labour, as well as to encourage discussion of the ways in which the gendered organization of work relates to the emotional and aesthetic dimensions of organizational life more generally, for instance, in terms of the gendering of organizational space and of workplaces. 

 

In 2012, the intention is to build upon the momentum provided by the previous two streams, to address some of the conceptual, empirical and theoretical gaps in the field and, in doing so, to contribute to the development of a more in-depth and focused understanding of gender, aesthetics and emotion in a number of key areas. Broadly speaking, therefore, the aim of the stream is to provide a forum within which to disseminate and discuss research on the conceptual, empirical and theoretical aspects of the interface between the emotional, the aesthetic and the gendered dimensions of work and organisation. The convenors seek to develop insights from previous streams by encouraging participants to explore the broader social materiality of gender, work and organization, teasing out interconnections between emotion, aesthetics, organizational space and place, embodiment, subjectivity and signification; exploring the mutually constitutive relationship between meaning and materiality as this relationship shapes and is shaped by gender.

 

The underlying aim of the stream is to develop discussion of papers by established academics, new researchers and doctoral students that focus on the interface between gender, emotion, aesthetics and the social materiality of work.

 

Possible contributions to the stream could include (but not be limited to) papers on:

 

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st October 2011 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and young scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. Abstracts should be emailed to mjtyler@essex.ac.uk  Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract.

 

 

http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

 

7th biennial international interdisciplinary conference, 27th – 29th June, 2012

Keele University, UK

 

Call for abstracts

 

Gender in Science Institutions and Knowledge System

 

Stream convenors:    

Barry Bozeman, University of Georgia, USA

Elizabeth Pollitzer, Portia Ltd, London, ENGLAND

Teresa Rees, University of Cardiff, WALES

Alison Woodward, Vrije Universiteit, Brussels, BELGIUM

                                   

Current understanding of the role of gender in science has evolved from the early and oppositional associations of ‘gender’ with women and men to gender as an organizing principle for both institutions and scientific disciplines. Yet greater understanding of gender issues and the growing evidence of how they impact on scientific work and quality has arguably failed to accelerate progress on achieving gender equality within science institutions or research. 

 

Growing worldwide competitiveness in research, development and innovation has focused attention of governments and science policy makers on measures to improve efficiency and effectiveness of the knowledge system. At issue are benefits of investment in education and research to society. It is of great importance that gender knowledge and expertise is integrated into the discussions about `modernisation’ of research structures, workplace practices and management of the scientific workforce. A wide range of actors play a role in bringing about change: research institutes, industry, funding bodies, learned societies, science publishing - and gender research scholars.

 

For example, in the European context, the `genSET project’ (www.genderinscience.org) and policy discussion within EC Directorate General for Research and Innovation on structural changes, recognised a need to modernise scientific systems. Particularly relevant to our stream are lessons learnt from the knowledge transfer activities enabled within genSET. The project brought together science leaders, gender experts, science strategy experts and over 100 institutions in a consensus forming and capacity building activities to address gender issues in the context of science work, workplace and workforce (www.gender-summit.eu). A key genSET output was a consensus report, containing a comprehensive strategy for gender equality work in science institutions and identifying four core areas where gender issues play a critical role: 1) institutional practices and processes, 2) human capital management, 3) compliance with regulation, and 4) science knowledge making.

 

The purpose of the stream is to help advance understanding of how gender equality and scientific quality shape and are shaped by one another. We invite submissions from the international research community that can help create theoretically informed, multidisciplinary understanding of the issues affecting the quality of science work, workplace and workforce. Contributions are welcome in any of the following or related themes:

·         Human capital - gender issues in the context of how social and intellectual capital within scientific institutions, is organised and deployed:  leadership and management styles; selection and performance of committees and panels; composition and performance of research teams; group-work; collaboration, networking, mentoring.

·         Legislation and compliance - research that investigates gender issues in the context of the role and impact of regulation and legislation: targets and quotas; internal and external evaluation of institutions; gender mainstreaming strategies and processes; the role and impact of national and European legislation.

·         Science knowledge making - Research that investigates gender issues in the knowledge production process: gender and the knowledge creation, application and dissemination in science; decision-making within research processes; standards and methods; persuading leaders; gender/sex analysis in training programmes; attitudes to criteria of excellence; negotiating and presenting gender issues in research contents, etc.

 

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st October 2011 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and young scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. Abstracts should be emailed in the first instance to contact point Elizabeth Pollitzer,  ep@portiaweb.org.uk  Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract.

 

 

Description: Description: Description: http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

 

7th biennial international interdisciplinary conference 27th -29th June 2012

Keele University, UK

 

Call for abstracts

 

Gendered Ageing at Work: Beyond the ‘Double Jeopardy’

 

Stream convenors:    

Susan Ainsworth, Dept. Management & Marketing, University of Melbourne, AUSTRALIA

Wendy Loretto, Business School, University of Edinburgh, SCOTLAND

Kathleen Riach, Essex Business School, University of Essex, ENGLAND

 

The concept of ‘double jeopardy’ has long sought to spotlight ways that ageing women experience disadvantage in social, political and organizational arenas. This disadvantage is not only constant in its various manifestations across the life course, with women ‘never the right age’ (Duncan and Loretto 2004), but also cumulative, as evidenced in older women’s overrepresentation in low paid occupations and tertiary employment (Perfect 2011), lack of savings (Fawcett Society 2007), and provision for retirement (Frericks et al. 2009). Whilst the effects of combined disadvantage may play out through the explicit marginalisation of working women, the potential for this to be challenged legally has been dwarfed by equality laws, since many countries have been hesitant to enact legislation which allows claims based on two or more forms of discrimination.

 

The gendered division in theories of ageing have also undoubtedly stunted an understanding of men’s experience of ageing. As a result, current literature focuses on male exclusion from the labour market based on health or structural reasons, rather than appreciate how ageing may be experienced in and through masculine trajectories and norms, such as the ‘breadwinner’ concept. Consequently, ageism continues to remain one of the ‘less visible gendered mechanisms’ (Gorman and Kmec 2007: 845) in both labour market policy and organizational practice. Indeed, even theories of gender have been charged with negating the importance of ageing men and women’s experience (Krekula 2007) through adopting an ‘add age and stir’ (to paraphrase Bernard et al. 2001: 173) approach where ageing is a post-hoc theoretical consideration.

 

Subsequently, the double jeopardy concept has often been used as shorthand for simplifying ‘women’s issues’, rather than questioning how ageing and gender are mutually constituted in the meso, macro and micro-political arenas of the labour market. However, as the demographic, social and economic landscape become increasingly complex, there remains a need for a comprehensive understanding of how gendered ageing is woven into the fabric of hegemonic discourses that constitute organizational life. Whilst labour markets become glocal and working lives increasingly diverse and characterised by ‘choice’, the extent to which these ideas are challenging culturally produced age-sensitive subject positions in the workplace such as ‘the sexual object’, ‘the father’, ‘the sage’ or ‘the old crone’ (Olsson 2000; Riad 2007; Onyx and Benton 1995) remains unknown.

 

Moreover, gendered ageing at work has thus far been restricted to the discussion of heterosexual women’s experiences of social, cultural or labour market disadvantage with little attempt to explore how the dynamics of organizational ageing are constructed in and through other gendered narratives surrounding, for example, class, masculinity and sexuality. To develop an understanding of organizational ageing beyond ‘double jeopardy’ tropes there is a need to appreciate the power differentials in and between these various categories and how they influence the experience of gendered ageing at work.

 

In light of this deficit, the objective of this stream is to interrogate the intersections between age and gender and/or other social categories in the new economy.  We invite full papers, work in progress or working papers from scholars at all stage of their career that address one of more of the following themes:

·         The experience of gendered ageing: Ageing may be configured or reconfigured through circuits of gendering practices. How do men and women embrace, resist or challenge these biological, discursive or embodied practices in an occupational setting?

·         Gendering effects of the ‘demographic timebomb’: How might the various demographic changes across the globe have an effect on working men and women in terms of health, caring responsibilities and perceptions surrounding the traditional ‘breadwinner’.

·         Accumulative disadvantage: in what ways might new forms of working and labour market restructuring, such as graduate labour markets, career changes and the rise of flexible work challenge, reproduce or increase disadvantage over an individual’s life course?

·         The intersectionality of ageing working lives: How might age and gender be organised and socially constituted through divisions and values surrounding ethnicity, class or sexuality (c.f. Moore 2009)?

·         State and organizational practices and policies: In what organizational spaces, such as diversity or pensions debates, are age and gender norms shaped or reproduced? How might an exploration of gendered ageing reveal the subtle inequalities surrounding divisions of labour or the values of particular forms of work?

·         Creative ways of thinking of ‘doing’ gendered ageing: What approaches, lenses or theories might help to further our understanding of gendered ageing and work? What tropes, analogies or myths are drawn upon to makes sense of gendered ageing at work?

 

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st October 2011 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and early career scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. In the first instance, abstracts (and any stream queries) should be emailed to at  gwoageing@gmail.com  For those submitting from a country that does not support gmail, please e-mail Kathleen Riach at kriach@essex.ac.uk Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract.

 

 

 

Description: http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

 

7th biennial international interdisciplinary conference, 27th – 29th June, 2012

Keele University, UK

 

Call for abstracts

 

Gender perspectives on Innovation

 

Stream Convenors:

Gry Agnete Alsos, Bodø Grad. School of Business, University of Nordland, NORWAY

Ulla Hytti, Turku School of Economics, FINLAND

Elisabet Ljunggren, Nordland Research Institute, NORWAY

Malin Tillmar, Linköping University, SWEDEN

 

There is a growing interest and body of work on innovation and gender. However, gendered studies of innovation or growth of firms remain scarce. There is a need for more empirical as well as conceptual studies to help us better understand the gendered aspects of innovation and firm growth.  Innovation is perceived to be a tool to create economic growth and wealth. The understanding of innovation has evolved from being viewed as radical to be viewed as incremental, even though the Schumpeterian understanding; “a new product, a new service, a new production process, usage or organizational structure introduced in the market or in the production process to create additional economic value” is often employed in policies. This definition/understanding is seldom gendered, although the policies and means to promote innovation and entrepreneurship result in significant gender skewness (Pettersson, 2007).

 

In most countries innovation policies have stemmed from and are linked to technology and science policies (Lindholm Dahlstrand & Stevenson, 2007), and therefore have contributed to strong technology connotations for the concepts of innovation and innovative firm or organization. Technology as a sphere is strongly gendered, for example, if measured by educational and occupational choices. The technological innovation and new innovative firms are almost exclusively dominated by male entrepreneurs and managers and most women-controlled businesses operate in retail, personal services, and personal care (Arenius & Kovalainen, 2006), which are not considered to represent a great potential for innovation or for growth. Still, the role of gender and gendered practices within the context of innovation and innovative firms has received only limited attention (e.g. Eriksson et al, 2008).

 

More specifically, innovation research has excluded women by mainly focusing on the private sector, specifically industries that men dominate both as business owners and as employees. Traditional women’s workplace tasks and activities have not been seen as relevant to innovation research and activities; men’s contributions, on the other hand, have been recognized as important (Blake and Hanson, 2005) and commonly used measures of innovation (establishing new businesses and patenting) indirectly accentuate men. Also, the commonly used innovation system focus, in which businesses (and not individuals) and clusters of businesses are considered as the central components (see e.g. Lundvall, 1992) contribute to a downplaying of gender (differences) (Petterson & Saarinen, cited in Lindberg 2008). Writings that do exist on gender issues in relation to innovation, have often focused on women, seeking to explain why they are not as successful as men when it comes to participating in innovation processes (Fenwick, 2004; Petterson, 2007; Strohmeyer and Tonoyan, 2005). There is very limited research focusing on the role of governmental innovation programmes and other similar structures, when it comes to influencing the extent to which men and women participate in innovation processes. Innovation policy is generally biased towards male dominated industries and work areas. The lack of attention to gender in research is part of legitimating and perpetuating status quo and allowing gender bias and sexism to remain unquestioned (Katila and Meriläinen 1999; Martin, 2006).

Recently, there has been an explicit aim to broaden the concept of innovation to cover also organisational, design and other non-technical innovations. In this vein, innovation is not understood through an end-product. Instead, innovation is something that happens in organizations, at work-places. So far, much of the research has been focused on antecedents and prerequisites to innovation, and the role of middle managers in creating an environment that encourages innovation and entrepreneurship (Hornsby et al. 2002; Kuratko et al. 2005). Based on recent literature the connection between management structures and individuals is more of a two-way street. Innovation emerges as top down and bottom up forces confront and negotiate and the negotiation takes place in the ‘conversational space’ (Heinonen & Toivonen 2007; 2008). In spite of the importance both economically, gender equality and otherwise, the issue of gender and gendering of these issues are not often addressed.

 

A particular area of interest with limited focus will be the `innovation’ (i.e. renewal) of the public sector which, arguably in a majority of countries, tends to be dominated by women employees, especially in the health care and social services. Previous studies from the public sector suggest that not all concepts originated from the private sector are easily transferable to the public sectors. For example, corporate entrepreneurship which is suggested to mean ‘the process whereby an individual or a group of individuals, in association with an existing organization, create a new organization or instigate renewal or innovation within that organization” (Sharma-Chrisma 1999:18) can gain meanings of cost-cutting and increased burden on employees when interpreted by the employees at the workplace (Heinonen, 1999). Investigations exploring what are legitimate innovations and innovative behaviors within public sector organizations; if and how they are linked to well-being and quality of working life, and how these processes are gendered, will be of great interest.

 

The stream on “Gender perspectives on Innovation and Growth:” invites both conceptual and theoretically informed empirical papers from different perspectives which address these issues. The following list is an indicative but not exhaustive list of potential topics:

·         innovation processes and practices and the role of gender and gender equality

·         studies of business development and growth support (e.g. consulting) from a gendered perspective

·         access to resources needed for innovation and growth from a gendered perspective (access to finance, skilled workforce, partners)

·         academic and corporate spin-offs

·         participation in innovation processes within and between firms from a gendered perspective

·         gendered understandings of knowledge and how knowledge is used in innovation processes

·         innovations and innovative behaviors in e.g. personal services and public sector organizations and the role of gender

·         the relation between the lack of women in top management positions, innovation, growth and the gender segregated labor market

·         gendered aspects of public policies and support schemes directed towards innovation and growth

 

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st October 2011 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and young scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. In the first instance, abstracts should be emailed to  gry.alsos@uin.no  Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract.

 

Description: http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

 

7th biennial international interdisciplinary conference, 27th-29th June, 2012

Keele University, UK

 

Call for abstracts

Intersectionality, work and organisations

 

Stream Convenors:

Carlos Gomez, University of Santiago de Chile, CHILE

Natalia Rocha-Lawton, University of Hertfordshire, ENGLAND

Jenny Rodriguez, Newcastle University, ENGLAND

 

The stream seeks to showcase conceptual, theoretical and theoretically informed empirical discussion about intersectionality, work and organisation. The stream has a twofold aim. Firstly, to advance discussions on epistemic critiques and their implications for the way intersectionality is used as an analytical and interpretive framework to explore dynamics of power at work and organisations. Secondly, at a more practical level, the panel seeks to contribute to the understanding of how intersectionality is/could be used when researching work and organisations.

Intersectionality continues to be at the centre of debates looking at power dynamics from the perspective that argues interdependence between intersecting inequalities of gender, race, sexuality, age, disability, social class, religion, and nationality, among others, in relation to subject formations, positions and identities. Conceptually, discussions have moved from embracing Crenshaw’s (1991) propositions about the need to challenge and deconstruct single axis notions of identity, to discussing notions of pure and hybrid intersectionalities (Brah & Phoenix, 2004). More recently, the debate has advanced to more divisive thinking where some authors (McCall, 2005) address methodological complexities of intersectionality, whilst others (Ehrenreich, 2002) question the suitability of the use of ‘intersecting categories’ as the best way to approach the discussion and hint to a post-intersectionality agenda that shifts from ‘intersectionality’ to ‘multidimensionality’.

Yet the scope of intersectionality makes it useful for both its theoretical and conceptual functions, as well as its political and agentic functions to highlight and explain the inseparability of categories of difference (individual, institutional, social and cultural) and how these interact with power (McCall, 2005; Yuval-Davis, 2006). The mutually constitutive nature of inequalities and structures of discrimination argued by intersectional theories also provides a useful foundation to understand continuities, shifts and transformations of power in organisations. At the same time intersectionality is a contested framework due to the broadness of intersectional theory and practice, which leads to different, inconsistent, ambiguous, and open-ended approaches (Phoenix & Pattynama, 2006; Davis, 2008). For instance, despite the mainstreaming of intersectionality in policy-making, intersectional looks at work and organisations at an empirical level, in particular lived experiences of workers and how intersections affect structures of work and organisational dynamics, remain under-researched. The work of Joan Acker (2000, 2006) on inequality regimes set important arguments to advance the discussion on intersectionality in work organisations and a few others (Staunæs, 2006; Britton & Logan, 2008; Essers & Benschop, 2009; Holvino, 2010; Dahlkild-Öhman& Eriksson, 2011; Healy et al., 2011) have added significant theoretical and empirical insights. Yet the potential of this discussion has not been fully capitalised and it remains at the margins of the meta-narratives of work and organisation. Taylor et al. (2010:2) argue that intersections need to be “empirically substantiated demonstrated and ‘delivered’ [because] the formalistic addition and repetition of ‘intersectionality’ leaves out the intimate interconnections, mutual constitutions and messiness of everyday identifications and lived experiences”. That is an imperative challenge to advance understanding on the interplay between intersectionality, work and organisations.

More discussion is needed to map the use of intersectionality in the study of work and organisations and expand understanding of how intersecting structures sustain and perpetuate power mechanisms and systems of subordination in work settings. Moreover, these discussions need to span across geographies, temporalities, disciplines and perspectives so that they account not only for complexities in the intersections themselves but also for how these interplay with wider issues associated to contemporary work and organisational dynamics, such as debates on migration, varieties of capitalism, and more generally globalisation.

The stream invites contributions of theoretical, conceptual and empirical works that focus on intersectional analyses of workers, work and/or organisations. Papers are invited on (but not limited to) the following themes:

 

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st October 2011 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and early career scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. In the first instance, abstracts should be emailed to  jenny.rodriguez@ncl.ac.uk   Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract.

 

 

Description: http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

 

7th biennial international interdisciplinary conference, 27th – 29th June, 2012

Keele University, UK

 

Call for abstracts

 

Inequality amongst low paid women workers

 

Stream Convenors:

Maree Keating, Victoria University, Melbourne, AUSTRALIA

Annie Delaney, Victoria University, Melbourne, AUSTRALIA

Rosaria Burchielli, LaTrobe University, Melbourne, AUSTRALIA

Non-Aus. co-chair (to be confirmed)

 

This stream is open to contributors who have a research interest in issues relating to the growing numbers of women working in what has become known as a continuum of exploitation. The inter-relationships between exploitative conditions of women’s work globally is of great importance to feminist scholars. This conference stream will contribute to debate around gender and organising strategies within the global labour continuum amongst low-paid workers. This may include topics such as gender and workplace organising; gendered shifts in low-paid work in different industry and national contexts; the interface between gender and global work and traditional and indigenous communities; gender, skill-recognition and worker education and gender and changing worker identity. We encourage the submission of papers based on empirical work and work in progress which analyses specific instances of low-paid women’s work in the global economy. In particular, this stream focuses on theories and organising strategies around the conditions and recognition of low-paid women’s work in the changing global context; including those engaged in informal, home-based, casual and intermittent, and under-protected jobs.

 

There are clear differences between low-paid women working in the exploitative, often informal work conditions in the global South and those working under more regulated work regimes in  developed countries in Europe, and in the US, Canada and Australia. However it has become apparent over the past two decades that the processes of labour casualisation, declining manufacturing and the growth of human care and domestic service industries in developed countries have been accompanied by increases in female labour-force participation, labour flexibilisation and dis-organisation and decreased protections for low-paid women workers (Moghadam, Franzway and Fonow, 2011). An investigation of commonalities among low paid women workers will contribute to feminist dialogue around strategies and theories to challenge global conditions which continue to erode women’s working lives in a range of different contexts. In India it has been estimated that 100 million women are in the informal (casual, sub-contracted and homebased) workforce (ILO, 2002).  In Australia, the number is in the tens of thousands (Hill, 2005) although an additional 27% of women workers are low-paid (Masterman-Smith & Pocock, 2008; Pocock, Skinner, & Ichii, 2009). Thousands of migrant women workers in Australia, once employed in highly unionised manufacturing workplaces in the textile, clothing and footwear industries, are now moving into fragmented, casual and intermittent jobs in human care and domestic service industries. In addition, there continues to be a burgeoning ‘informal’ parallel workforce underpinning what remains of the niche-oriented clothing industry in developed countries such as Australia. As other parts of the world, this informal workforce largely consists of the under-paid, under-protected and largely un-recognised labour of female, and often migrant homeworkers.

 

Researchers within universities, international institutions, civil society and nongovernment organisations seek to identify the critical factors which create and maintain the marginalisation of informal and precarious women workers, and to understand their strategies and resources (ILO, 2002). One factor commonly linked to worker marginalisation is the fragmentation of work processes and spaces, creating challenges to the formation of relationships, networks and organisation amongst workers. The interconnectedness of work fragmentation and self-perception amongst women workers has been proposed by numerous studies conducted in the fields of labour, adult education and gender studies (Chun, 2009; Fischer & & Ziebell, 2009; Armstrong, 2006, Adkins and Skeggs, 2004), and requires further empirical evidence. The literature describes the systematic normalisation of non-standard working hours in post-industrial countries and the casualisation of jobs in low-paid, often female-dominated industries (Standing, 2009).  Irregular, precarious, unprotected and insecure conditions are increasingly the ‘standard’ features of working life for growing numbers of casual, sub-contracted and homebased women workers world-wide (Beneria, 2001). Much of this work is ‘informal’, leaving workers vulnerable to extreme exploitation (Webster, Lambert, & Bezuidenhout, 2008). Under such global conditions new organising strategies are important to support, so that vulnerable workers can access resources and resist further encroachments. Informal work is under-researched and workers are neither acknowledged by institutions and statistics, nor represented by unions (ILO, 2002).

 

Whilst casual workers may have a contractual relationship with an employer or a recruitment agency, their positions are increasingly ‘peripheral’ within the labour market, with many navigating a constant movement in and out of paid employment. It is demonstrated in much of the research that declining unionism in Australia and elsewhere globally is linked to the increasing casualisation of work (Chun, 2009; Lambert & Webster, 2010). Moreover, it is recognised that precarious, casual work may share many of the features of informal work. There is growing evidence that the defining characteristics of homebased work are found across geographical and economic locations (Burchielli, Buttigieg & Delaney, 2008). While some research is beginning to document these similarities, it is logical to expect there may be differences between informal workers who are just beginning to experience labour organisation, and casual workers who previously participated in formal, and unionised work. This stream will welcome papers which explore and of the following or related questions:

 

 

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st October 2011 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and young scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. In the first instance, abstracts should be emailed to   maree.keating@vu.edu.au  Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract. 
 
 

Description: http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

 

7th biennial international interdisciplinary conference, 27th – 29th June, 2012

Keele University, UK

 

Call for abstracts

 

Multiple Discrimination and Representation at Work: Intersectionality in Practice

 

Stream Convenors:

Hazel Conley, Queen Mary University of London, ENGLAND

Sue Durbin, University of the West of England, ENGLAND

Jan Kainer, York University, CANADA

Sian Moore. University of Leeds, ENGLAND

Tessa Wright, Queen Mary University of London, ENGLAND

 

Intersectionality is a ‘hot topic’ in research on equality and diversity.  The term is credited to Kimberle Crenshaw a black feminist legal scholar who critiqued mainstream feminist discourse as essentially white in its origin and application. The concept has since received much academic attention from both black and white feminists. The theory and concept has become ever more complex and abstract in this writing, making it increasingly difficult to apply to empirical research.

 

Feminist legal scholars have also identified difficulties in applying theoretical principles to developments in equality law. Similarly trade unions around the world have mixed views of the application of intersectionality as an organising or representation tool, voicing concerns about contradictions between the concepts of solidarity and sectionalism. However the need to find new ways of supporting and organising workers suffering from intersecting forms of disadvantage is imperative as the effects of the global financial crisis begin to bite. The ILO (2011) reports that workers who already suffer as a result of discrimination in the workplace are affected disproportionally as the global economic crisis opens new spaces for prejudice and inequality to take root. Those who face intersecting forms of labour market disadvantage will almost certainly suffer compounded and multiple discrimination. 

 

Our proposal for a stream at the 2012 Gender, Work and Organizations conference would seek papers to combine the influential debates on intersectionality and representation at work that have appeared in the journal over many years. The purpose of the stream would be to bring together researchers who are applying theories of intersectionality to empirical research in the workplace as well as those who address the methodological challenges of such an approach. Papers would be sought to address the following indicative, but not exhaustive, themes:

·         How does intersectional discrimination manifest itself in the workplace?

·         What are the barriers (political, economic, legal, structural, organisational) that hinder an intersectional approach to tackling discrimination at work?

·         What are the theoretical/conceptual/methodological barriers that hinder or support empirical research and policy formation?

·         What legal, policy and strategy tools are useful for challenging intersectional discrimination?

·         What initiatives are being taken by trade unions and other worker representation groups to support workers experiencing intersectional discrimination?

·         How are equity-seeking groups identified by trade unions? Are some groups supported, and others ignored?

·         Can solidarity accommodate difference?

 

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st October 2011 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and young scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. In the first instance, abstracts should be emailed to  H.Conley@qmul.ac.uk  Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract.

 

 

Description: Description: http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

 

7th biennial international interdisciplinary conference, 27th – 29th June, 2012

Keele University, UK

 

Call for abstracts

 

Change and organizational learning

 

Stream Convenors

Marieke van den Brink, Radboud University Nijmegen, NETHERLANDS

Jennifer de Vries, University of Western Australia, Perth, AUSTRALIA

Ulla Erikson-Zetterquist, University of Gothenberg, SWEDEN

 

The aim of this stream is to advance contemporary thinking about gender and diversity, and organizational theory and practice by bringing together international scholars with an interest in gender, diversity, change and organizational learning.

 

Despite numerous initiatives that aim to transform organizations into more inclusive and diverse places to work, change remains - at best - slow (Eriksson-Zetterquist & Styhre 2008; Benschop & Verloo 2010; Van den Brink & Benschop 2012). Research on gender and diversity management often recommends changing beliefs, cultures, routines and/or structures. In short, a transformational approach to organizational change is required (Meyerson and Fletcher 2000). Yet interventions adopting a transformational approach remain, according to Acker (2000) innovative and rare, and encounter significant challenges (for example see Organization 2000, vol.7).  On the other hand little scholarly attention is paid to interventions popularly in use within organizations, which remain under-theorised, and disconnected from the need for broader organisational change (de Vries 2010).  An enduring gap between theory and practice remains. What is lacking is a comprehensive strategy to bring about transformational change in organizations. 

 

Transformational change requires changing core organizational practices, such as the way organizations recruit and select new members, identify employees with leadership and/or management potential, train their employees and allocate tasks and projects.  Little is known about how organizational cultures, routines or structures could be changed, and which initiatives and practices have proven the most effective in different settings (Deutch 2007; Kalev, Dobbin & Kelly 2006). There is a need for empirical research to understand the success or failure of gender and diversity organizational change, especially given the considerable effort and funds that contemporary organizations are channelling into this issue.

 

Only a few gender and diversity scholars have engaged with the wealth of literature on organizational learning, which addresses the questions of how and under what circumstances individuals and organizations can learn (Gherardi 2009; Foldy, 1999). Organizational learning theories address the way to change dominant underlying beliefs, cultures, routines and structures (Argyris 1976). These theories also address how learning processes can be institutionalized, meaning how structures, processes and strategies that facilitate learning at the organizational level can be established and maintained (Romme & van Witteloostuijn 1999). What can we learn from these theories and how can we link individual learning to organizational change? Studying these learning processes more closely will enable scholars to focus on the opportunities for organizational change.

 

We wish to explore approaches theorizing change towards diversity and the learning processes of individual organization members in different contexts. This track invites theoretically and/or empirically informed papers from different disciplines that deepen our understanding of change, interventions, learning, and micro-political practices. Cross-fertilization between gender and diversity scholarship, in the instances where these have remained siloed is particularly encouraged. We welcome papers that:

 

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st October 2011 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and young scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. In the first instance, abstracts should be emailed to mcl.vandenbrink@fm.ru.nl   Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract

 

 

Description: http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

 

7th biennial international interdisciplinary conference, 27th- 29th June, 2012 

 Keele University, UK

 

Call for abstracts

Queering gender, work and organization

Stream Convenors:

Alison Pullen, Swansea University, WALES

Anne Rippin, University of Bristol, ENGLAND

Torkild Thanem, Stockholm University, SWEDEN

Louise Wallenberg, Stockholm University, SWEDEN

Queer theory has enjoyed a somewhat ambivalent position in the study of gender, work and organization. While Butler’s work on gender performativity has been central in rethinking gender and sexuality beyond dualistic and stereotypical conceptions of masculinity and femininity (see e.g. Brewis and Linstead, 2004; Linstead and Pullen, 2006; Thanem, 2011; Thanem and Wallenberg, 2011), queer theory as such and queer subject positions have attracted less attention. At the heart of this stream therefore lies a desire to engage with all things queer, particularly as they relate to work and organizations. Following Halberstam, we refer to queer as ‘non-normative logics and organizations of community, sexual identity, embodiment, and activity in space and time’ (2005:6). We are hopeful that this will spur active reengagement with contemporary debates surrounding the conceptualisation and practice of queer identities and non-identities, queer spaces and places, and the political leverage that queer knowledge and methodology brings about. In particular, we seek to create a politically transgressive space in the academy by engaging in dialogue with queer lives, queer theory and queer performativity to challenge authoritative and heteronormative forms of thinking, working and organizing in our scholarly field as well as in everyday work organizations.

Contributors may wish to reengage philosophically with some of the early writers on queering such as de Lauretis (who coined the term in 1991 but distanced herself from it three years later); Kosofsky Sedgwick (who broke the silence on oppressive discursive regimes and presented performative taxonomic frameworks for thinking, living and theorising queer); Butler (who has challenged hegemonic heteronormative practices); through to Halberstam (whose theorising of queer time and space has brought forth political activism). At the same time, we recognize that this might require contributors to critically interrogate and go beyond queer theory and politics.

In this stream, we ask, what is the future of queer practice and politics for continued debates in the Gender, Work and Organization community? Does the future involve re-membering the advancements made which have all challenged the relationship between gender and sexuality, identity and non-identity, materiality and corporeality, and gender and post-gendering? Further on, what are the limitations of queer theory and politics, and how might we create ways of thinking, living, working and managing that are more politically transgressive?

This is also a phenomenological task, and we hope to bring together researchers who present queer lived experiences through gendered, sexual and corporeal performativity, problematize the relationship between gendered and sexual identities and corporeality, and interrogate and resist discrimination and stigmatization encountered by queer identities. Areas for possible contributions include but are not restricted to:

·         Queering organisational heteronormativity and homonormativity.

·         Queer theory, queer analysis and queer representation.

·         Queer identities and non-identities, sexuality, gender and corporeality/embodiment.

·         Queer (work)places, (organisational) spaces and temporalities.

·         Queer politics, resistance and activism.

·         Queer agency, community, identity politics, and class politics.

·         Queer performance and performativity.

·         Post-gender debates and sexual politics.

·         Queer engagements with oppression and exploitation in work and organizations.

·         Material and philosophical transgression and subversion.

·         Queer aesthetics and materiality.

·         Queer parody, humour and performativity.

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st October 2011 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and young scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. Abstracts should be emailed to  torkild.thanem@fek.su.se  Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract.

Description: http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

 

 7th biennial international interdisciplinary conference 27th -29th June 2012

Keele University, UK

 

Call for abstracts

 

Sexuality at Work: International Issues and Perspectives

 

                  Stream Convenors:

Fiona Colgan, London Metropolitan University, ENGLAND

Judith Pringle, Management Dept, Auckland University of Technology, NEW  ZEALAND

Nick Rumens, Department of Management, University of Bristol, ENGLAND

 

This stream welcomes multidisciplinary papers which focus on sexuality at work at a time when social attitudes, behaviour and legislation concerning sexual orientation are undergoing major change in many countries. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and heterosexual people are active agents in the changes taking place and this stream welcomes the opportunity to develop an understanding of attitudes, behaviour and the dynamics of sexuality within contemporary organisations. It also provides an opportunity to reflect on the ways in which social movement politics and changing and conflicting global social attitudes have impacted on organisations and their development and delivery of equality and diversity strategies in this area. The ‘first wave’ of research in the area of sexual orientation at work focused primarily on organisations as difficult places for lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans people to be. It identified homophobia and transphobia, discrimination and workplace inequities. While acknowledging its important contribution, this stream would like to draw on the ‘second wave’, sexual orientation research agenda which has developed as lesbian, gay, trans and bisexual people have increasingly gained rights and recognition in the public sphere, alongside heterosexuals plus a focus on sexuality as a key organising dynamic within all organisations. We encourage the examination of how lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and heterosexual people perceive, understand and experience sexuality and sexual orientation, and also explore the gains and limits on recognition, inclusion and visibility in the workplace. The stream welcomes a consideration of the intersectionality of sexual orientation with other markers of identity, difference and inequality. We argue that this topic is of increasing importance to organisations and that this is an exciting time in terms of change, reform and debate. Our stream at the 2012 Gender, Work and Organization Conference encourages international and multidisciplinary contributions which will consider the implications of ongoing changes for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and heterosexual individuals as well as national and international work/service providing organisations. Contributors may choose to draw on material from a wide range of empirical spheres and theoretical perspectives. We have chosen not to specify themes in order to encourage a wide range of theoretical and empirical contributions relating to how LGBT and heterosexual sexualities are experienced, identified and understood in organisations in different cultural contexts and at specific moments in time.

 

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st October 2011 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and young scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. Abstracts should be emailed  (marked `GWO 2012 Sexuality at Work International Stream’) to: f.colgan@londonmet.ac.uk.  Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract.

 

Description: http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

 

7th biennial international interdisciplinary conference, 27th- 29th June, 2012 

 Keele University, UK

 

Call for abstracts

 

Women’s organising:

Groups by Women, for Women, about Women

 

Stream Convenors:

Nicole Avdelidou-Fischer, Queen Mary University of London, ENGLAND

Gill Kirton, Queen Mar, University of London, ENGLAND

Non-UK co-chair  (to be confirmed)

 

Around the world, women have a long and remarkable history of separate organisation. Particularly the late 1800s/early 1900s as well as the 1960s/1970s are marked by waves of female togetherness, volunteerism and activism. The years before, between the two waves, and after, are supposedly ‘calmer’. However, today there is something of a resurgence of women-only groups in various domains, including the professions, trade unions, certain sectors and industries. Single-sex coalitions can become the platform through which women organise to expand their rights as autonomous citizens, voice their critique of state institutions and society as patriarchal/gendered, or offer advice and practical support to other women. At the same time, women-only groups can be a platform, through which women defend traditional values, protect family as a social institution, or perform alleged feminine practices. Women organise in small groups, national networks, up to transnational movements, in internet chat-rooms, neighbourhoods, workplaces, trade unions, or religious institutions, in inclusive events and caucuses or specific to particular age, ethnicity or profession, in informal, loosely organised schools and branches or formal with closed membership.

 

Overall there has been surprisingly scarce research into the state of women’s separate organisation in years outside the well-known waves and little research on contemporary women’s groups and women’s movements. This last point is especially noteworthy in present times which are marked by debated claims that equality has been achieved and that women have hardly any reasons or appetite for collective gender-based action. Indeed, there have been major advances on the equality ground, but we argue that recent repertoires of women’s action and modes of organising are simply less visible to the public or the media than, for example, the street protest and strong grassroots activism of the 1970s. That is to say, there is a gap between how the public opinion sees women’s separate organisation in the 21st century and its actual but concealed presence. Women’s collective spaces are evolving in line with women’s shifting identities, values or grievances, with the changing face of feminism, post-feminism or anti-feminism, the new political and social systems or purely, with women’s ways of looking at the world.

 

Hence, this stream responds to the need for a greater appreciation of the forms that women’s separate organising takes in different historical and socio-political contexts. We invite contributions of a theoretical as well as empirical nature, and work–in–progress, that document how women come together to attain a common purpose, explore their modes of organising and evaluate their tactics and outcomes. “No man's land” is used in the title of this stream literally as we’re dealing with women-only groups, however, metaphorically it is a term for land that is often the subject of dispute between parties that leave it unoccupied due to fear or uncertainty. The term was originally used to define a contested territory or a neutral (and therefore safe) zone. Accordingly, we encourage writers to think creatively about what a women’s group can be, and we welcome inter-organisational, inter-cultural, and inter-generational comparisons. Papers may address, but are not restricted to the following themes:

·         The historical use of separate organising by women and its effects in different countries. First-wave, second-wave, in-between, and contemporary generations of women activists (feminists, non-feminists, anti-feminists).

·         Organisational forms, hierarchical structures, leadership styles and power inside women-only groups.

·         Group affiliation based on shared identities and concerns. The impact of class, professional or managerial status, age, ability, racial and sexual diversity on organising.

·         A group’s positional strength and acceptance by the host organisation or the public sphere. Distinctions between separate organising, autonomous organising, and separatism.

·         Steps towards women’s mobilisation and patterns of participation in women-only groups.

·         Learning benefits –individually and collectively, transfer of skills, cross-generational support.

·         Collective organisation and belongingness in times of globalisation and cyber-space.

·         Opportunities and challenges of explicit women-only membership policies in times of gender mainstreaming and intersectionality.

·          

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st October 2011 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and young scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. Abstracts should be emailed to  n.avedlidou-fischer@qmul.ac.uk  and  G.Kirton@qmul.ac.uk  Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract.

 

Description: http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

 

7th biennial international interdisciplinary conference, 27th – 29th June, 2012

Keele University, UK

 

Call for abstracts

`New masculinities’? Reshaping the discourse

Stream convenors:    

Pam Alldred, Brunel University, ENGLAND

Umut Ozkaleili, Cyprus International University, CYPRUS

Janaki Rajan, Jamia Millia University, New Delhi, INDIA

Sweta Rajan-Rankin, Brunel University, ENGLAND

 

This stream seeks to move beyond hegemonic notions of men in society towards a more nuanced understanding of multiple masculinities in a global context. Men and masculinities, once in the periphery, have increasingly gained interest in gender studies through discussions around men and feminism (Murphy, 2004; Digby, 1998), women in male-dominated professions (Corocoran-Nantes et al, 1995), embodied masculinities in managerial practices (Collinson & Hearn, 1995) and queer studies and diversity politics (Peterson, 2003). Further, there has been an explosion of studies on men’s engagement in active fatherhood (Brandth & Kvande, 2002; Brannen, 2006), challenging assumptions of the ‘distant father’ male-breadwinner stereotype. Despite the gains in masculinity studies, conflicts and contestations persist around the location of men within women’s studies (Landreau et al, 2011). We define masculinities both as a discourse(s) and as a set of embodied social practices which are pivotal to gender, work and organizations and to challenging and reframing managerial practices (see Kimmel 2004). Within organizations, masculinities are manifest in the ordering of organizational hierarchies, such that dominant practices place value on male models of working (Acker, 1990; Smithson et al, 2005). These are embedded within discourse(s) of masculinity which can promote aggressive competitive paternalistic practices and undermine more progressive forms of masculinities (Kerfoot & Knights 1993; 1998). The privileging of hegemonic masculine ideals can thus denigrate and even suppress other forms of emerging masculinities (Knights & Kerfoot, 2011; Messner, 1992). Critical examinations of the intersectionalities between race, sexuality, gender and masculinity discourses (Bhabha, 2000) can help to unpack how these liminal and valid discourses of ‘new masculinities’ can be given voice in a variety of ways (Anderson, 2009).

 

A limitation in current masculinity studies has been the dominant focus on specific countries and geographical regions (especially the USA and Western Europe) (McDowell, 2003) without much research on other parts of the world, such as the emerging markets and developing country contexts (but see Verma et al, 2003; UNDFW, 2003; Jeffrey et al, 2008). This in turn has meant that masculinities so represented often reflect white middle-class notions of masculinities (Edwards, 2006), while voices of low-income, blue collar workers, ethnic minorities and sexual minorities are not always highlighted. Hegemonic masculinities (Connell, 1995), while useful in identifying structural barriers in the organization of work, have often been harmful to both men and women’s constructions of gender roles, with more recent challenges to the dominant theory questioning its utility (Howson 2006). And while global insecurities in the form of the recent economic recession, civil unrest and rioting in the UK, poor educational attainment among young male students in school, point to a backlash that would seem to corroborate the continued utility of hegemonic masculinity theory; particularly given the aggressive competitive paternalistic practices and expectations within current work climates. Yet research has not sufficiently examined how young men, older male workers, low income workers, third world workers, men who do ‘feminine’ caring service work, men who survive competitive demands in the financial sector define, understand and explore their own shifting masculinities. Nor has it fully addressed how changing cultural attitudes, particularly around sexuality and religion, and new technologies like the internet affect the embodied practices of men of all generations in an increasingly globalized world. We invite innovative and high quality submissions, especially from an international or comparative perspective on new masculinities, on these broad topic areas:

     Men, masculinities and the media

     Unemployment and men’s life experiences during recession

     Masculinities and men’s experiences in the caring professions

     Post-colonial theory and masculinities in developing countries

     Translocalism, gender and masculinities

·                    Gay men in straight worlds

     Men, metrosexuality and homophobia

·                    ‘Acting out’: Young masculinities and criminal behaviour

     Masculinities, pedagogy and schooling

     Fatherhood, fathering and masculinities

 

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st October 2011 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and young scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. Papers can be theoretical or theoretically informed empirical work. Promoting a more global vision for masculinity studies, submissions from international authors in and beyond the west are especially welcomed. We particularly welcome submissions from multi-disciplinary and international teams of scholars. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. Abstracts should be emailed to  sweta.rajan-rankin@brunel.ac.uk  Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract.

Description: Description: http://www.wiley.com/bw/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Banners/GWAO/gwao_large.jpg

 

7th biennial international interdisciplinary conference, 27th – 29th June, 2012

Keele University, UK

 

Call for abstracts

 

General Stream

Stream Convenors

Deborah Kerfoot, Keele University Management School, ENGLAND

Non-UK co-chairs – to be confirmed

 

As a central theme in social science research in the field of work and organisation, the study of gender has achieved contemporary significance beyond the confines of early discussions of women at work.  Launched in 1994, Gender, Work and Organization was the first journal to provide an arena dedicated to debate and analysis of gender relations, the organisation of gender and the gendering of organisations.  The Gender, Work and Organization conference provides an international forum for debate and analysis of a variety of issues in relation to gender studies. The 6th international interdisciplinary conference at Keele University attracted over 330 international scholars from 37 nations.

 

The Conference is organised primarily as a series of streams. Authors whose work does not readily fit one of the stream themes but who wish to present their paper at GWO2010 submit their work to the General Stream. 

 

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st October 2011 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and early career scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. Papers can be theoretical or theoretically informed empirical work. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. Abstracts should be emailed to   d.kerfoot@mngt.keele.ac.uk   Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract.